Hardwoods

While NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. primarily harvests softwoods, we produce small volumes of hardwoods as well. The forests of Northwest BC are dominated by conifers (softwoods) but in fall the beautiful colours of the deciduous hardwood foliage is easily visible against a backdrop of green. 

NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. has access to red alder (Alnus rubra), paper birch (Betula papyrifera), and black cottonwood (Populus balsamifera ssp. Trichocarpa).

Black Cottonwood 
Paper Birch
Red Alder

NorthPac-Forestry-Group-Hardwoods-tablet

NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. has access to Black Cottonwood (Populus balsamifera ssp. trichocarpa), Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera) and Red Alder (Alnus rubra). These hardwood species all have numerous traditional uses. For example, First Nations used the bark of the red alder for dyeing basket material, wood, wool, feathers, human hair, and skin. Red alder is low in pitch so it used for smoking meat. Birch bark was used a material for baskets and for wrapping and storing food. Lastly, cottonwood was occasionally used for dugout canoes and because it burns well it was used to make friction fire sets. NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. has sold hardwoods domestically and internationally.

Black Cottonwood

Like paper birch, black cottonwood, and its relative balsam poplar, are found in nearly every corner of the province. Older black cottonwoods are recognizable by their thick and deeply grooved bark. Black cottonwood can grow to 50 metres in height. Often a logging block will only contain one or two trees, which, because of their size, are left standing to provide habitat for birds. Black cottonwood is the hardwood most commonly produced by NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. This species is sold to China where it is used for general construction purposes.

Paper Birch

Paper birch can be found in nearly every corner of British Columbia. It is a fast-growing species and will often dominate a site after a disturbance, such as a forest fire or avalanche. Paper birch is easily recognizable for its striking white and black bark. In addition, paper birch is an important winter food for many woodland species, such as deer, moose and snowshoe hares. In eastern Canada, birch is harvested to produce a variety of products, while in BC it is primarily harvested for firewood.

Red Alder

NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. produces incidental volumes of red alder from our coastal operations. Red alder is valued as a material for furniture production and flooring. It does not like cold climates and is typically only found in low elevations in coastal British Columbia. Red alder is not shade tolerant and dominates nutrient-rich sites such as riverbanks after a disturbance. 

NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. has access to Black Cottonwood (Populus balsamifera ssp. trichocarpa), Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera) and Red Alder (Alnus rubra). These hardwood species all have numerous traditional uses. For example, First Nations used the bark of the red alder for dyeing basket material, wood, wool, feathers, human hair, and skin. Red alder is low in pitch so it used for smoking meat. Birch bark was used a material for baskets and for wrapping and storing food. Lastly, cottonwood was occasionally used for dugout canoes and because it burns well it was used to make friction fire sets. NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. has sold hardwoods domestically and internationally.

Black Cottonwood

Like paper birch, black cottonwood, and its relative balsam poplar, are found in nearly every corner of the province. Older black cottonwoods are recognizable by their thick and deeply grooved bark. Black cottonwood can grow to 50 metres in height. Often a logging block will only contain one or two trees, which, because of their size, are left standing to provide habitat for birds. Black cottonwood is the hardwood most commonly produced by NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. This species is sold to China where it is used for general construction purposes.

Paper Birch

Paper birch can be found in nearly every corner of British Columbia. It is a fast-growing species and will often dominate a site after a disturbance, such as a forest fire or avalanche. Paper birch is easily recognizable for its striking white and black bark. In addition, paper birch is an important winter food for many woodland species, such as deer, moose and snowshoe hares. In eastern Canada, birch is harvested to produce a variety of products, while in BC it is primarily harvested for firewood.

Red Alder

NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd. produces incidental volumes of red alder from our coastal operations. Red alder is valued as a material for furniture production and flooring. It does not like cold climates and is typically only found in low elevations in coastal British Columbia. Red alder is not shade tolerant and dominates nutrient-rich sites such as riverbanks after a disturbance.